Author Archives: polyhedra

About polyhedra

Polyhedra is a non-profit cultural association for cross-disciplinary research and activities in art and science fostering ‘face to face’ encounters between the arts, sciences and humanities.

[Book release] New Innovate Heritage Publication available

CULTURAL COMMONS & URBAN DYNAMICS

JOIN US for the online presentation of the book that will take place TODAY, December 3rd, 5 p.m. CET, on google.meet 

We are delighted to announce the publication of “Cultural Commons & Urban Dynamics: A Multidisciplinary Perspective“. The book results from a series of talks and encounters that took place at the Innovate Heritage 2019 international symposium and artistic event hosted by the Department of Law, Economics and Sociology at the University of Catanzaro (Italy), 11-12 October 2019.

Today, cities are being intensively reshaped by unexpected dynamics. The rise and growth of the digital economy have fundamentally changed the relationship between the urban fabric and its resident community, overcoming the conventional hierarchy based on production priorities. Moreover, contemporary society discovers new labour conditions and ways of satisfying needs and desires by developing new synergies and links.This book examines cultural and urban commons from a multidisciplinary perspective. Economists, architects, urban planners, sociologists, designers, political scientists, and artists explore the impact and implications of cultural commons on urban change. The contributions discuss both cases of successful urban participation and cases of strong social conflict, while also addressing a host of institutional contradictions and dilemmas. The first part of the book examines urban commons in response to institutional constraints from a theoretical point of view. The second and third parts apply the theories to case studies and discuss various practices of sustainable planning and re-appropriation in the urban context. In closing, the fourth part develops a new urban agenda as artists imagine it. This book will appeal to scholars interested in the social, economic and institutional implications of cultural and urban commons, and provide useful insights and tools to help local governments and policymakers manage social, cultural and economic change.

You can get your copy of the book here

A massive thank you to the editors Emanuela MacrìValeria Morea and Michele Trimarchi for making this publication happen.

Hope to see you online later TODAY!

Follow the book presentation event on facebook

Innovate Heritage is an ongoing project initiated in 2013 by Polyhedra together with Oriental Heritage Without Borders.

The project counts on the support of the German Commission for UNESCO, the UNESCO Chair in Heritage Studies at BTU Cottbus-Senftenberg, the Prussian Cultural Foundation, ZK/U Centre for Art & Urbanistics in Berlin, and many more local and international initiatives and organisations in the artistic, academic and heritage sectors. 

[Network] ICT & Arts @ SERN

ICT & Arts is playing an important role in the StartUp Europe Region Network (SERN) – a network of regions dedicated to scaling up startup support. It is mentioned as one of the thematic activities of the Interreg Europe project, which intends to capitalize and seek inspiration on the current art-science-technology programs to explore their transfer at regional level.

Find out more: SERN ICT & Arts

Creativity and the involvement of society play a major role in innovation processes. Promoting initiatives intersecting Art-Science-Technology contribute to competitiveness, sustainability and social inclusion. But how, exactly, are these achieved? There’s a need to articulate this further and contextualise. Polyhedra.eu offers a space to discuss these issues and more…

[Advice Paper] SSH: Essential Fields for European Research & in Horizon 2020

Advice Paper No.11 – June 2012
League of European Research Universities

Wim van den Doel (Universiteit Leiden)
Katrien Maes (LERU Office)

We live in a rapidly changing world, which requires European societies to stay focused, to be innovative and to think critically. In this paper, LERU emphasises the importance of Social Sciences and Humanities (SSH) disciplines and the interconnectedness of knowledge to this story: they are of vital importance to the future of Europe. Throughout the paper, LERU examines six (probably to become seven) Horizon 2020 societal challenges, explaining e.g. how SSH research is relevant to each of them. LERU also proposes various recommendations to stimulate SSH research in Horizon 2020, such as the establishment of a European SSH Platform and the support of e.g. the ERC and Marie Curie programmes.

Download the report:
https://www.kowi.de/Portaldata/2/Resources/horizon2020/LERU-AP-11-SSH-Essential-fields.pdf

[Book] Creating ArtScience Collaboration. Bringing Value to Organizations.

Insightful book about artscience collaborations by Claudia Schnugg, researcher and advocate of artscience collaboration, and a producer and curator of residency programs.

Abstract: How can artist-scientist collaboration be of value to science and technology organizations? This innovative book is one of the first to address this question and the emerging field of art-science collaboration through an organizational and managerial lens. With extensive experience collaborating with and advising institutions to develop artist in residency programs, the author highlights how art-science collaboration is such a powerful opportunity for forward-thinking consultants, managers and institutions. Using real-life examples alongside cutting edge research, this book presents a number of cases where these interactions have fostered creativity and led to heightened innovation and value for organizations. As well as creating a blueprint for successful partnerships it provides insights into the managerial and practical issues when creating art-science programs. Invaluable to scholars and practitioners interested in the potential of art-science collaboration, the reader will be shown how to take an innovative approach to creativity in their organization or research, and the ways in which art-science collaborations can mutually benefit artists, scientists and companies alike.

Find out more @ https://www.palgrave.com/gp/book/9783030045487#aboutAuthors

Vittorio Gallese: Art, brain and human nature

Art, brain and human nature: what can we know about ourselves?

Discussion with neuroscientist and Einstein Visiting Fellow Vittorio Gallese, novelist and essayist Siri Hustvedt, and philosopher and moderator Gert Scobel. 04 June 2018, 7 pm

What is the mind? This fundamental question remains unanswered in philosophy and science. Is the mind part of the body or is it something separate from it? Are the brain and the mind the same thing? Can the mind be disembodied into an algorithm and then realized in a machine? If the brain is the key to mind and consciousness, how much do we actually know about the brain and what does it have to do with “the self“? Why does art matter? Why do we tell stories? What is the relationship between art and science? Is configuring the mind a feminist issue? And: Why are all these questions urgent at this particular moment in culture?

Continue reading

KLAS Workshop @ MPI *November 27th/28th, 2017

1st KLAS Workshop

AESTHETICS get SYNTHETIC:
Knowledge Link Through Art & Science

Polyhedra is pleased to announce that registration for the first KLAS Workshop “AESTHETICS get SYNTHETIC: Knowledge Link Through Art & Science” is now open and can be accessed from the following link: klas.mpikg.mpg.de/workshop/

The workshop is an opportunity to bring together scholars and practitioners to jointly discuss and reflect on contents, approaches and methodologies that draw the link between synthetic biology and artistic research and how those can synergically interact by mutually interrogating and reconsidering their methodologies and modes of operation in an Artist in Residence program like KLAS. In this workshop we are particularly interested in discussions and perspectives that explore how different institutions, organizations and interest groups with relevant expertise and knowledge of research, innovation and education address contemporary challenges of future developments in and beyond their respective knowledge silos.

There is an additional Call for Posters. Selected posters will be on view throughout the two days of workshop. Their presentation will take place at 16h on Tuesday 28th of November.

The workshop will take place in the Main hall of the Max Planck Campus in Potsdam-Golm the afternoon of Monday 27th and Tuesday 28th of November 2017.

There will be a live-stream for those who won’t be able to attend.


With the participation of

Sabine Adler
Arren Bar-Even
Christoph von Braun
Adriaan Eeckels
Peter Fratzl
Detlev Ganten
Reinhard Lipowsky
Agnes Meyer-Brandis
Roger Malina
Darian Meacham
Heike Catherina Mertens
Martina Münch
Bryan Nowack
Ingeborg Reichle
Hans-Jörg Rheinberger
Tom Robinson
Maximilian Schich
Nathalie Singer
Otavio Schipper & Sergio Krakowski
Volker Stollorz
Antje Tepperwien
Alex de Vries
Lothar Willmitzer
Siegfried Zielinski


FIND OUT MORE

MSc Psychology of the Arts, Neuroaesthetics & Creativity

Goldsmiths, University of London is launching a new MSc programme for the academic year 2018-19 in Psychology of the Arts, Neuroaesthetics and Creativity, the first postgraduate programme in the world for the scientific study of aesthetics and creativity.

It will be led by Dr Guido Orgs (Programme Director), Dr Rebecca Chamberlain and Prof Joydeep Bhattacharya

 

At the intersection of the arts and the sciences, the programme introduces you to the psychology and the cognitive neuroscience of how humans generate new ideas, how we appreciate beauty, and how we form preferences.

Aesthetic and creative decisions are relevant in the visual and the performing arts, and in many applied and commercial contexts, ranging from clinical interventions to curating exhibitions, from dance choreography to marketing and advertising. Based in the Department of Psychology, in collaboration with Computing, Media and Communications and the Institute of Management Studies, the course builds critical knowledge, research and communication skills across the arts and the sciences, centred around two key topics: the psychological and brain mechanisms of making (Creativitiy) and appreciating (Neuroaesthetics) art. Conducting a research project with an interdisciplinary focus will prepare you for a research career in aesthetic or creative science, working in the creative industry, or to develop your artistic practice.

Goldsmiths is uniquely placed to offer this programme, with an internationally renowned reputation in the arts and the sciences. Existing courses combining art and psychology often have a largely therapeutic focus and rarely cover the psychology of aesthetic appreciation or creative cognition, in a broader profile. In contrast, business-oriented courses in marketing, advertising and consumer psychology often lack adequate scientific training in experimental psychology or cognitive neuroscience methods, which is required for a scientific approach to aesthetics and creativity. Optional modules based in the departments Media & Communications, Computing, and the Institute of Management Studies will complement and challenge the scientific perspective, acknowledging the richly diverse, unique and culturally-specific nature of human aesthetic and creative practice.

MSc Psychology of the Arts, Neuroaesthetics & Creativity

When artists get involved in research, science benefits

File 20170814 1313 ova2e3
The authors have collaborated on an Antarctic research project, investigating tiny ice crystals and their role in climate.
Gabby O’Connor’s Studio Antarctica/Johanna Mechem, CC BY-ND

Craig Stevens and Gabby O’Connor

When artists and scientists get together, creative sparks can fly. Collaborative sci-art projects are increasingly popular and one obvious benefit is the greater visibility of the research through the artist’s work.

Our project explored scientific and artistic aspects of Antarctic ice crystals.

But what’s in it for the scientists? It reinvigorates a curiosity about the system and brings an outsider perspective – but one that is expert in observing.

Taking a different perspective

We draw on a six-year collaboration to look at how science benefits from embracing a wider perspective on creativity. Our joint project started with an art-science speed-dating event, aimed at building collaborative teams.

Our connection centres around an Antarctic research project investigating the formation of platelet ice, which plays an important role in the annual growth cycle of sea ice around the Antarctic continent. In particular, the science looks at how tiny ice crystals influence much larger climate processes.

Craig Stevens in Antarctica: tiny crystals of ice help explain how sea ice surrounding the continent grows and decays.
Brett Grant, CC BY-ND

We were able to build on the intrinsic fascination people have with Antarctica and the interest in climate science. The scientists acted as a conduit of research to the artist. This added another layer of meaning to the artwork and an entry point to conversations around Antarctic ocean processes and climate change. This loop of enquiry seems to happen differently in art-science collaborations.

Broadening creativity

Our collaboration has evolved from arm-chair slide shows, through cross-disciplinary participation and Antarctic expeditions, to a final stage that includes a proliferation of ideas around art, education and science.

The benefits to science can be difficult to articulate but chief among them is a reminder of the importance of open-ended exploration. Another is to be asked questions by someone who spent even more time simply looking at the object of scientific inquiry than the scientists themselves.

The first phase of our project was to find a catalyst to connect enthusiastic creative people. A second phase followed with the science team taking basic components of an art work (a large paper sculpture) with them to Antarctica and assembling them as they saw fit, much like a piece of science equipment. This had impact, but was probably detrimental to the power balance in the collaboration because it left the scientists in control of both the art and the science. It turned out that the scientists didn’t follow instructions, and instead responded to the constraints of the working environment – much like the art practice.

Artist Gabby O’Connor spent hours photographing platelet ice retrieved from underneath Antarctica’s sea ice.
Gabby O’Connor’s Antarctica Studio/Craig Stevens, CC BY-ND

The next step involved getting the artist to Antarctica, embedded with the science. This had to be navigated carefully to ensure that the art retained its own priority as well as collaborating with the science, rather than being simply co-located.

A cornerstone to this was a request that the artist should make scientific measurements and, by doing so, added a whole new dimension where by there was an art perspective on the actual scientific process.

History of sci-art collaboration

In the past, artists were often involved in research purely to document the science. Captain James Cook took the painter William Hodges to polar extremes where he captured Antarctic seascapes. When the paintings were prepared for an exhibition in 2004, X-radiography revealed a different and unfinished view of icebergs in a rough sea.

Edward Wilson, a doctor and artist, accompanied Robert Falcon Scott to the pole and beyond. In some ways, these people acted as impartial sounding boards for the explorers and scientists at the time. The ease with which photography is achieved today has reduced the need for this role, but has something been lost along the way?

Much has been written about how facts alone do not convince people. A sideways approach that comes from an entirely different artistic perspective might therefore have a chance of penetrating established boundaries.

The art of science communication

Platelet ice.
Gabby O’Connor, CC BY-ND

Where once science was its own domain, this is no longer the case. Implications of research findings need to connect with broader audiences. But how can you explain something you barely understand yourself to multiple publics?

Analogues with popular culture can bridge this gap. With around 90% of New Zealanders and even more Australians engaging with art, it provides a useful conduit to science.

Our collaboration was initially largely unfunded and viewed as an irrelevant curiosity. However, support built quickly, to the point that the project was used to open a recent national Antarctic Science Conference.

Through all the phases of our work, we made connections with young people. We had sufficient support from teachers to develop workshops and extra-curricular activities for schools, and the climate topic made this part of our engagement more effective.

Platelet ice builds up on the underside of sea ice and has to be sampled through carefully melted holes in the ice.
Gabby O’Connor, CC BY-ND

What is in it for science?

Lots, it turns out. The scientist is reminded of the power of curiosity, something that can get lost in times of targeted research. The artist also asks questions based on hours and hours of observing the system at hand. Somewhat unexpectedly in our case, the artist became a documentor of the work in a way that we hadn’t previously achieved.

Added benefits are embedded with the next generation of scientists who will more readily span the divide, to the extent that they may not know a gap once existed. Also, part of the future science cohort may exist simply because of the inspiration found in art that connects with science.

The ConversationWe are at a time where the entire collective knowledge of our species is available with a stab of a fingertip. It becomes possible, necessary even, to leap across disciplines to generate new ideas.

Craig Stevens, Associate Professor in Ocean Physics and Gabby O’Connor, Artist, PhD candidate, interdisciplinary researcher

This article was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article.

Agnes Meyer-Brandis and duo Otavio Schipper/Sergio Krakowski first KLAS Artists-in-Residence

Agnes Meyer-Brandis (Germany) and the duo Otavio Schipper and Sergio Krakowski (Brazil) have been selected to participate in the artist-in-residence program KLAS

 

Within KLAS – “Knowledge Link through Art and Science” – the Max Planck Institutes of Colloids and Interfaces and Molecular Plant Physiology invite for the first time contemporary artists to develop their own project at the Potsdam-Golm Science Park (Germany) and the University of Groningen (The Netherlands). In the course of this eight month pioneering project, artists will work side by side with researchers in order to develop a new artwork bridging contemporary art practices and scientific research.

Agnes_OtavioSergio

more: klas.mpikg.mpg.de/2017/meyer-brandis-schipper-krakowski-first-klas-awardees/

Call for Artists – KLAS Residency Program 2017

There are two Artist in Residence programmes that will take place at the MPI for Colloids and Interfaces, the MPI for Molecular Plant Physiology (both located in Golm, Germany) and the University of Groningen (The Netherlands). The Call is open until January 31st, 2017.

http://klas.polyhedra.eu/open-call/

AESTHETICS get SYNTHETIC: Knowledge Link through Art and Science (KLAS)
http://klas.polyhedra.eu/

Synthetic biology is a thriving field at the interface between
molecular and cell biology and engineering disciplines. It is
predominantly based on design, construction and analysis of new
functions and unprecedented biological systems while it also allows a
better understanding of existing biological phenomena by means of its
synthetic “reconstruction”. AESTHETICS get SYNTHETIC: Knowledge Link
through Art and Science (KLAS) main goal is to initiate collaborative
artistic and scientific exchange to foster transdisciplinary dialogues
as well as to contribute to a wider understanding and appreciation of
synthetic biology.

The knowledge link established during the residency period intends to
influence both the work of the participant research groups and the
resident artists. This bidirectional feedback is expected to provide a
highly fertile ground for a dialogue that should also attract the
attention of non-specialized audiences much more easily than purely
scientific orientated discourses.

Artists interested in exploring the aesthetic and discursive
possibilities that are derived from the connections between innovative
creative practices, new materialistic approaches and synthetic biology
research are invited to submit an application.

This competition is open for artists to propose all kind of innovative
concepts and ideas in the field of visual art, interactive art,
digital music/sound art, sculptural art, hybrid art, performance &
choreography, architecture and photography.

The call is open to artists internationally to apply for a residency
program at the Max Planck Institute of Colloids and Interfaces and the
Max Planck Institute of Molecular Plant Physiology, both located in
Golm (DE) as well as the Groningen Biomolecular Sciences and
Biotechnology Institute of the University of Groningen (NL).

http://klas.polyhedra.eu/open-call/

The residency programme

There will be two Artist-in-Residence stays within the time period
June to September 2017. The artists are expected to be present for a
minimum of two weeks in each of the two locations (Potsdam-Golm and
Groningen). Both Artist-in-Residence stays are intermitted by a
private time for the artist to develop the final project. It is at the
chosen hosting institution for the second Artist-in-Residence stay
where the work will be showcased later on. A commitment of the artist
to deliver an art-piece within one year after the starting date of the
residency will be requested.

Artists will be free to work on their own projects but will also be
expected to interact with their colleagues, participate in the
lectures and group talks during their stay and document/ share their
experiences for both academic and general audiences in an online form.

The artist will be expected to be in-residence for 2+2 weeks between
June and September 2017.

http://klas.polyhedra.eu/open-call/