Category Archives: Uncategorized

Agnes Meyer-Brandis and duo Otavio Schipper/Sergio Krakowski first KLAS Artists-in-Residence

Agnes Meyer-Brandis (Germany) and the duo Otavio Schipper and Sergio Krakowski (Brazil) have been selected to participate in the artist-in-residence program KLAS

 

Within KLAS – “Knowledge Link through Art and Science” – the Max Planck Institutes of Colloids and Interfaces and Molecular Plant Physiology invite for the first time contemporary artists to develop their own project at the Potsdam-Golm Science Park (Germany) and the University of Groningen (The Netherlands). In the course of this eight month pioneering project, artists will work side by side with researchers in order to develop a new artwork bridging contemporary art practices and scientific research.

Agnes_OtavioSergio

more: klas.mpikg.mpg.de/2017/meyer-brandis-schipper-krakowski-first-klas-awardees/

[Conference + Art] Innovate Heritage “Art & The City”

Innovate Heritage 2016 „Art & The City: New Cultural Maps“

27th-28th of October 2016 at the School of Architecture, Mediterranea University.

Polyhedra is proud to present its project with the Università degli Studi Mediterranea di Reggio Calabria: the first satellite edition of Innovate Heritage!

ih-2016-programme-1

The two-day workshop „Art & The City: New Cultural Maps“ explores intuitions, approaches, views and actions from different perspectives and cultures, facing questions and dilemmas related to heritage management and governance in multi-cultural urban and metropolitan frameworks.

The discussion will focus upon the radical change affecting society and the economy, and transforming the cultural paradigm from a competitive and dimensional struggle into a participative and synergic challenge, with new needs to cross-fertilise tradition and innovation.

Economists, urbanists, jurists, architects, philosophers and artists will perform an intensive and nonprejudicial exchange aimed at crafting sharp questions and drawing credible trails to our future, in the awareness of the growing importance of art and culture in social dynamics.

download the programme
The event will be filmed and videos soon available!

If you would like to host a satellite edition of Innovate Heritage, please get in contact at a.c.polyhedra@gmail.com

Picturing The Body In The Laboratory [conference] // Berlin, 6-7 Nov 2015

Genesis and topicality of evidence-oriented imaging in institutions of the long 19th century and today

6-7 November 2015
Humboldt University, Berlin
Image Knowledge Gestaltung, Interdisciplinary Laboratory,
Sophienstr. 22a

“Our aim is to investigate the particular role of the image in evidence production around 1900 in order to sharpen our understanding of the ground laying concepts for today’s epistemic role, limitations as well as of the convenience of laboratory work. Specifically we want to know: what is it exactly that makes the image so attractive around 1900? What can the image do that the word cannot? And does this also apply to the images described that cannot lay claim to any kind of material evidence in the form of a trace? Is there a particular obstinacy in these evidence-oriented images in terms of the Bildakt? Are these images »actors« in a way that is specific to this kind of image (Mitchell 2006)?

One of our particular focuses of interest is the role played by the technical means of producing the traces or images. What are the implications of the technology that developed at this time for evidence orientation? Do we find similar – or which other – principles at work in laboratory evidence technologies in the 21st century? What higher-order similarities does a transdisciplinary examination of different media reveal?”

…find out more


 

CONFERENCE PROGRAMME

Cultural history of science on traces of the body in the lab around 1900

10.00 Registration, Welcome address & Coffee

10.30 Keynote Barbara Orland (University of Basel)
Seeing the Building Blocks of the Human Body. The Biopolitics of Microphotography 1840–1870

11.30 Short Coffee Break

Panel 1

moderator: Ann-Cathrin Drews (HU Berlin/Image Knowledge Gestaltung)

11.40 Bettina Bock von Wülfingen (HU Berlin/Image Knowledge Gestaltung)
The New Cell Staining Techniques since the 1870s and their Role in Conceiving Sex/Gender in the Cell

12.20 Marietta Kesting (HU Berlin/Image Knowledge Gestaltung)
Creating Photographic Identification

13.00       Lunch

14.00 RESUMÉ 1

Panel 2

moderator: Mark-Oliver Casper (HU Berlin/Image Knowledge Gestaltung)

14.30 Sophia Kunze (HU Berlin/Image Knowledge Gestaltung)
Necessary Reduction of Complexity or Dubious Essentialisation? Reception of Natural Scientific Knowledge in the History of Arts

15.10 Wolfgang Schäffner (HU Berlin/Image Knowledge Gestaltung)
Schreber’s Evidence

15.50 Bettina Uppenkamp (Dresden University/Image Knowledge Gestaltung)
Evidence and Identification. On the History of the Fingerprint

16.30RESUMÉ 2

17.00 Finish
Organisational remarks. Snacks and nibbles and move to
> Lecture Hall 2094, Main Building, Unter den Linden 6

19.00 Keynote Peter Galison (Harvard University)
The Conviction of Scientific Images

Natural Sciences and Laboratory Traces Today

> Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, Main Building, Seminar Room 2093,  Unter den Linden 6

9.30    Welcome Coffee

10.00Keynote Soraya de Chadarevian (UCLA)
»It is not enough, in order to understand the Book of Nature, to turn over the pages looking at the pictures. Painful though it may be, it will be necessary to learn to read the text.«
Visual Evidence in the Life Sciences, c.1960

Panel 3

moderator: Kathrin Friedrich (HU Berlin/Image Knowledge Gestaltung)

11.00 John Nyakatura (HU Berlin/Image Knowledge Gestaltung)
Trace, Experiment, Inference: Images and the Generation of Knowledge in Paleobiology

11.40 Anelis Kaiser (University of Bern)
Sex/Gender in the Brain: From Voxels to Knowledge

12.20 Thomas Stach (HU Berlin/Image Knowledge Gestaltung)
Traces, Data, Facts: How Morphology Generates Evidence

13.00 Lunch

14.00 RESUMÉ 3

Panel 4

moderator: Markus Rautzenberg (FU Berlin, mecs Lüneburg)

14.30 Dieter Weiss (University of Rostock)
Superresolution Microscopy and the Discovery of Nano-Machines in Living Cells

15.10 Anne Dippel (HU Berlin/Image Knowledge Gestaltung, FSU Jena, Leuphana Lüneburg),
Lukas Mairhofer
(University of Vienna)
Believing the Pattern. A conversation on Traces in Physics

16.30 RESUMÉ 4
Coffee and Goodbye
(brief organisational authors meeting)

[download programme]

 

There has been much recent interest in the suggestion that quantum mechanics might be better understood in terms of its causal structure. Novel formalism has provided a new perspective on the discrepancy between the causal structure of the classical and quantum worlds.

This conference brings together both physicists and philosophers with an interest in exploring the consequences of this new approach to causality in a quantum world. The conference is part of the research project The Causal Power of Information in a Quantum World.

The project investigates the theses that physically embodied information acquires causal power in the effective operation of intelligent agents, either natural or artificial, and that new kinds of causal relations will naturally arise when information and control is embodied in quantum systems.

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If you wish to attend, please fill out the registration form no later than July 31 2015. Speakers do not need to fill this form.

SCIENTIFIC COMMITTEE

Gerard Milburn, Phil Dowe, Andrew White, Matt Farr, Peter Evans, Alessandro Fedrizzi, Fabio Costa, Christina Giarmatzi, Sally Shrapnel.

Exhibition Opening · Matteo Bultrini · Studio Polyhedra, Rome

MATTEO BULTRINI. NELLO SPECCHIO DEL COLORE [On Facing Colour]

Studio Polyhedra, Roma · 23 – 31 maggio 2015
Inaugurazione: Sabato 23 maggio 2015, ore 19:00

Matteo Bultrini (Roma, 1979) è uno dei più promettenti e influenti artisti italiani nel panorama pittorico del momento. Le molteplici ricerche sul colore del XX secolo trovano nella sua opera il loro punto di confluenza estrema. Anche se il suo tragitto è autonomo, il suo lavoro oscilla tra le grandi polle cromatiche di Serge Poliakoff e le raffinate e aristocratiche trame di luce di Victor Pasmore: una ricerca che racconta, come in un poema, l’alfabeto del colore, una lettera di luce.

A cura del Prof. Carmine Benincasa, ‘Nello Specchio del Colore’ (23 – 31 maggio) raccoglie 30 opere rappresentative della ricerca dell’artista in quest’ultimo triennio.

La mostra inaugura la prima stagione artistica di Studio Polyhedra – il nuovo spazio espositivo di Polyhedra, organizzazione impegnata nella sinossi comparata tra arte e scienza e finalizzata alla ricerca artistica e contemporanea.

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Exhibition Opening · Matteo Bultrini · Studio Polyhedra, Rome

MATTEO BULTRINI. NELLO SPECCHIO DEL COLORE [On Facing Colour]

Studio Polyhedra, Roma · 23 – 31 maggio 2015
Inaugurazione: Sabato 23 maggio 2015, ore 19:00

Matteo Bultrini - Epifania

 

 

 

 

 

Matteo Bultrini (Roma, 1979) è uno dei più promettenti e influenti artisti italiani nel panorama pittorico del momento. Le molteplici ricerche sul colore del XX secolo trovano nella sua opera il loro punto di confluenza estrema. Anche se il suo tragitto è autonomo, il suo lavoro oscilla tra le grandi polle cromatiche di Serge Poliakoff e le raffinate e aristocratiche trame di luce di Victor Pasmore: una ricerca che racconta, come in un poema, l’alfabeto del colore, una lettera di luce.

A cura del Prof. Carmine Benincasa, ‘Nello Specchio del Colore’ (23 – 31 maggio) raccoglie 30 opere rappresentative della ricerca dell’artista in quest’ultimo triennio.

La mostra inaugura la prima stagione artistica di Studio Polyhedra – il nuovo spazio espositivo di Polyhedra, organizzazione impegnata nella sinossi comparata tra arte e scienza e finalizzata alla ricerca artistica e contemporanea.

 

find out more

Trick or Truth: the Mysterious Connection Between Physics and Mathematics [ESSAY CONTEST]

ESSAY CONTEST @ FOUNDATIONAL QUESTIONS INSTITUTE.

DEADLINE March 4th!

      In many ways, physics has developed hand-in-hand with mathematics. It seems almost impossible to imagine physics without a mathematical framework; at the same time, questions in physics have inspired so many discoveries in mathematics. But does physics simply wear mathematics like a costume, or is math a fundamental part of physical reality?
      Why does mathematics seem so “unreasonably” effective in fundamental physics, especially compared to math’s impact in other scientific disciplines? Or does it? How deeply does mathematics inform physics, and physics mathematics? What are the tensions between them — the subtleties, ambiguities, hidden assumptions, or even contradictions and paradoxes at the intersection of formal mathematics and the physics of the real world?
    This essay contest will probe the mysterious relationship between physics and mathematics.
    Examples of foundational questions addressed by on-topic entries might include:
    • Why does mathematics seem so “unreasonably” effective in fundamental physics? (Or does it?)
      • Is there a “pre-established harmony” between them, because the world is fundamentally mathematical?
      • Are we pushed to call certain theories or disciplines more fundamental because they are in some sense more mathematical?
      • Or, are we just lacking the right mathematics to treat other fields with similar power and rigor as physics?
      • What would it mean for something in the physical world to be NOT describable or model-able in terms of mathematics?
      • Why does physical reality obey one particular set of mathematical laws and not others (Or does it?)
    • How deeply does mathematics inform physics? How deeply does physics inform mathematics?
      • How does the structure and availability of existing mathematics shape the formulation of physical theories?
      • Why do we prefer mathematically simple theories to complex ones? What even defines simplicity? And is there an objective measure of complexity?
      • May we be missing interesting physical theories because we are committed to particular mathematical frameworks, or because suitable ones have not yet been developed?
      • To what extent can or should we extrapolate our mathematical equations of physics beyond the domains where we have tested them?
      • How much of mathematics has been constructed as if it had been due to physics motivations?
      • Should frameworks that are internally consistent and display mathematical elegance, but which lie beyond experimental reach, be regarded as physical theories or rather as branches of mathematics or philosophy?
      • Out of the countably infinitely many true statements that could be derived from a given set of sufficiently rich axioms, how have we arrived at what we know as mathematics? How much is evolutionary history? Our mental makeup? Utility? Beauty? Something else?
    • What are the tensions between physics and mathematics?
      • Are there hidden subtleties or overt controversies in how or why mathematics is used in physics (or other sciences)?
      • What is randomness, and what is the nature of probability?
        • What is the fundamental origin of stochasticity, and does that affect how we think of probability? Is it quantumness? Or indexical uncertainty of various types? Or lack of knowledge?
        • Is there true randomness, or is it only apparent? Are there hidden patterns in things that seem random to us now?
      • Do incompleteness theorems such as Goedel’s play a role in physical theory? What do they allow, forbid, or elucidate?
      • How should we think of infinity? Is it a useful mathematical concept that does not really apply to physical reality? Or could real physical systems be infinite?
      • Are there mathematical contradictions or paradoxes that tell us something about physical reality?

find out more on FQXi website..

 

 

On Being the Right Size: Science, Technology and Scale [workshop]

A one-day workshop taking place at UCL, 29 April 2015.

scale

[Deadline for submission has passed]

On Being the Right Size: Science, Technology and Scale

Scholars in the Science and Technology Studies community, broadly construed, have had much to say about specific kinds of scale. For example, we have asked how measurement scales are built, how science travels from local to global and back again, how laboratories transform microcosm and macrocosm, how models stand for the world, and how big science differs from table-top experiment. Likewise history, sociology and philosophy of technology have yet adequately to bring scale and scaling into view. But what can we say about scaling in general? What do models, games, photographs, maps, instruments, units, inscriptions, amplifiers and laboratories have in common?

We want to ask: how is scale in science governed? Can, or should, big science ever become small again? What scales should STS and HPS study? Is there more to scale than the local and the global? What are the relationships between materiality and scale? Are technologies always implicated in changing scale? Is the human scale the best scale for science?

We are particularly interested in fresh thinking about scale that is integrative, bold, playful and not afraid to challenge sacred cows, big or small.

The workshop will involve short papers from speakers, invited and found through an open call, with plenty of time for discussion. We are planning a mix of historical, philosophical and sociological perspectives.

More information on the STS department can be found here.

 

Vittorio Gallese on Experimental Aesthetics [lecture] · 11 Feb 2015 · London

“The Body, the Brain, Symbolic Expression and Its Experience: An Experimental Aesthetics Perspective”

 

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Wed Feb 11th 6pm & Feb 18th 6pm.
Chandaria Lectures, Senate House (London WC1), Room 349, third floor

Description

Cognitive neuroscience can shed new light – from its own methodological reductionist perspective – on the aesthetic quality of human nature and its natural creative inclination. By exploiting the neurocognitive approach, viewed as a sort of ‘cognitive archeology’, we can empirically investigate the neurophysiological brain-body mechanisms that make our interactions with the world possible, detect possible functional antecedents of our cognitive skills and measure the socio-cultural influence exerted by human cultural evolution onto the very same cognitive skills. We can now look at the aesthetic-symbolic dimension of human existence not only from a semiotic-hermeneutic perspective, but starting from the dimension of bodily presence. In so doing we can deconstruct some of the concepts we normally use when referring to intersubjectivity or to aesthetics and art, as well as when referring to the experience we make of them.

This approach, which I’ll designate as ‘experimental aesthetics’, can enrich our understanding of symbolic expression and its reception, by studying their neural and bodily components. The definition of art and the way we appreciate it are  both historically and socio-culturally determined. However, while acknowledging that aesthetic experience is multilayered, the cognitive primacy of our reactions to the outcomes of symbolic expression can be challenged. In the course of the three lectures ’ll review empirical work on the aesthetic experience of static and moving images like paintings,  and movies. I will posit that the aesthetic experience of the outcomes of human symbolic expression can be grounded on the variety of embodied simulation mechanisms they evoke in beholders.

I will show that the symbolic processes characterizing our species, in spite of their progressive abstraction and externalization from the body, keep their bodily ties intact. Symbolic expression is tied to the body not only because the body is the symbol-making instrument, but also because it is the main medium allowing symbols experience.

It will be concluded that cognitive neuroscience can surrender us from the forced choice between the totalizing relativism of social constructivism, which doesn’t leave any room to the constitutive role of the brain-body in cognition, and the deterministic scientism of some quarters of evolutionary psychology, which aims at explaining art exclusively in terms of adaptation and modularity.

find out more…